News: 2018

    Universal Guidelines for Artificial Intelligence

    October 17, 2018

    CSISAC members, individuals and organisations are invited to sign on the Universal Guidelines for Artificial Intelligence (UGAI):

    https://thepublicvoice.org/AI-universal-guidelines/

    The focus of the guidelines is on the specific impact of AI decision-making about individuals. The Guidelines are intended to help ensure that AI systems be deployed so that humans and not machines determine our future. The main reference document for this undertaking is the Madrid Privacy Declaration (2009).

    The CSISAC is planning to take the Universal Guidelines as the main reference for our work on the topic regarding those goals, and we will be proposing to add them to the set of references supporting the development of the OECD relevant policy. The public release of the guidelines has been scheduled for 23 October, 2018 in Brussels.

    OECD Meetings: CSISAC to attend the 77th session of the Committee on the Digital Economy (CDEP)

    October 2, 2018

    The 77th session of the OECD Committee on the Digital Economy Policy (CDEP) will take place on 14-16 November 2018 in the OECD headquarters in Paris (France).

    The session will continue the ongoing such as the Going Digital Horizontal Project, Artificial Intelligence, E-Commerce or Online Platforms, and will include updates on the contribution to the G7 and G20 among other topics. In all this work, the CSISAC will be fostering the Civil Society Principles, towards stronger privacy protection standards of personal data, including alignment with GDPR; asking for increased accountability on artificial intelligence, such as algorithmic transparency, including digital security aspects; and asking to ensure affordability on telecom pricing.

    The CSISAC will take part in this set of meetings to bring the voice of Civil Society to the OECD policy making process. Confirmed participants include CSISAC Steering Committee member and Executive Director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) Marc Rotenberg, and CSISAC member Claire Milne, supported by CSISAC Secretariat Suso Baleato. The CSISAC wants to thank the EPIC for supporting this effort, together with the European Digital Rights (EDRi), and previous contributors. Civil Society participants involved in the related topics are encouraged to express their interest towards getting involved in the ongoing work and join the CSISAC delegation at the OECD.

    OECD Workshop on Growing and Shaping the Internet of Things (IoT) Wellness and Care Ecosystem : Enablers and Barriers

    July 25, 2018

    The Civil Society council (CSISAC) is looking for expressions of interest from civil Society participants to take part in the OECD Workshop on Growing and Shaping the Internet of Things (IoT) Wellness and Care Ecosystem : Enablers and Barriers.

    The workshop will be held in New York on 4-5 October, 2018 at Cornell-Tech. You will find attached the latest draft Agenda. The workshop will examine the state of play, opportunities and challenges in expanding the availability and use of IoT-related products and services to enhance wellness , deliver effective remote care, prevent
    hospital readmissions and support functional ability. The workshop will aim to review and assess existing policies with a special focus on privacy and digital security and discuss use cases highlighting good practices to help policy makers and private sector move ahead and promote the positive elements of the IoT while minimising risks.

    This workshop builds on recent work by the OECD on IoT (Smart Homes) and aims to feed into 2019-2020 work in this area as well as on Artificial Intelligence. It also aims to inform work on enhanced access and sharing of data for health , and on the implementation of the OECD Council Recommendation on Health Data Governance.

    Specifically , it will aim to review:

    · The emerging Internet of Things wellness/healthcare ecosystem;

    · Critical enablers for progress to build out this ecosystem (what is
    needed to unlock the value of IoT for wellness and healthcare);

    · Best use cases and public policy advances across public and private
    sectors;

    · The value and potential benefits of a better developed IoT-based
    health care environment;

    · Main Challenges and Policy Implications with a special focus on data
    governance, privacy and organisational accountability;

    · Technical, legal and public policy barriers that need to be
    addressed .

    OECD Workshop on Measuring Online Platforms, Cloud Computing and Related Services

    July 25, 2018

    The Civil Society council (CSISAC) is looking for expressions of interest from civil Society participants to take part in the OECD Workshop on Online Platforms, Cloud Computing and Related Services.

    As part of the OECD Going Digital measurement initiatives we are organising a 2-days workshop next 6/7 September on two key measurement challenges: (1) how to measure economic activities conducted through online platforms; and (2) how to measure the supply and demand of cloud computing and related products in economic statistics. Please see the attachment for more information on the Workshop. The discussion at the workshop will help identifying the data needed for measurement of online platforms, cloud services and related products in economic statistics and avenues through which these data can be gathered. The recommendations will be included in the overall Measurement Roadmap, a key part of the "Measuring the Digital Transformation" publication which will be launched at the main Going Digital conference in March 2019.

    OECD Workshop on Protection of Children in a Connected World

    July 25, 2018

    The Civil Society council (CSISAC) is looking for expressions of interest from civil Society participants to take part in the OECD is planning an Expert Workshop on "Protection of Children in a Connected World".

    The workshop will be hosted by the University of Zurich (Switzerland) on 15-16 October 2018. This workshop is organised in the context of the review of the 2012 OECD Recommendation for the Protection of Children Online[http://www.oecd.org/sti/ieconomy/protecting-children-online.htm] . It will examine how the landscape that created the need for the 2012 OECD Recommendation has since evolved. Specifically , it will aim to
    review:

    · What new opportunities and online risks are emerging in a landscape
    where children have become users of all sorts of devices, not just
    computers and laptops but of multiple Internet-enabled and connected
    devices?

    · Have regulatory frameworks, policies and educational approaches kept
    pace with the new online risks ? Can they be effective in mitigating
    the new risks without disrupting children's beneficial uses of the
    Internet and online interaction?

    · What digital literacy deficits have to be tackled today and what new
    critical digital skills are needed to strengthen children's risk
    awareness and resilience?

    · What are the relevant developments in the area of consent and
    controls and what are the implications for policy?

    · How can technological developments help build a protective
    environment?

    The workshop will gather international experts including representatives from the OECD, academia, from public and private sectors, policy makers,
    representatives of relevant regional and international organisations,
    regulators, clinicians and consumers' associations.

    OECD Global Forum on Digital Security for Prosperity

    July 4, 2018

    The OECD is planning an inaugural conference of the Global Forum on Digital Security for Prosperity in December 2018. The Civil Society council (CSISAC) is looking for expressions of interest from civil Society participants to take part in this event.

    The OECD Global Forum on Digital Security for Prosperity is dedicated to multilateral and multi-stakeholder dialogue on digital security for economic prosperity. It aims to consolidate an international network of governmental officials and non-governmental experts dealing with digital security for prosperity, and facilitate convergence of views for a trusted and resilient digital environment.

    This inaugural meeting will discuss the roles and responsibilities of actors for digital security. In particular, it will address good practice for digital security governance in businesses and other organisations, and how to make digital technologies more secure throughout their lifecycle. It will bring together experts from public and private sectors in OECD member and non-member countries in order to help shape the international public policy agenda in this area.

    More about:
    - Global Forum on Digital Security for Prosperity: http://oe.cd/ds4p.
    - OECD Recommendation on Digital Security Risk Management for Economic and Social Prosperity: http://oe.cd/dsrm
    - OECD work on digital economy policy: http://www.oecd.org/sti/ieconomy/
    - OECD: http://oecd.org

    OECD Meetings: CSISAC to attend the 76th session of the Committee on the Digital Economy (CDEP)

    April 30, 2018

    The 76th session of the OECD Committee on the Digital Economy Policy (CDEP) will take place on 14-18 May in the OECD headquarters in Paris (France). This session will follow up on the work developed during the semester by the Working Parties and Expert Groups. The session will continue the projects previously launched, such as the Going Digital Horizontal Project, the analytical work the Internet of Things and telecommunication pricing, and the statistical work on digitalisation measurement. In addition to that, this session is expected to discuss policy analysis and empirical evidence on artificial intelligence, 5G or zero rating. Many other projects will be discussed as well including the impact of ICT in the environment, and digitalisation measurement. In all this work, the CSISAC will be fostering the Civil Society Principles, towards stronger privacy protection standards of personal data, including alignment with GDPR; asking for increased accountability on artificial intelligence, such as algorithmic transparency, including digital security aspects; and asking to ensure affordability on telecom pricing.

    The CSISAC will take part in this set of meetings to bring the voice of Civil Society to the OECD policy making process. Confirmed participants include CSISAC Steering Committee member and Executive Director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) Marc Rotenberg, and CSISAC member Claire Milne, supported by CSISAC Secretariat Suso Baleato. The CSISAC wants to thank the EPIC for supporting this effort, together with the European Digital Rights (EDRi), and previous contributors. Civil Society participants involved in the related topics are encouraged to express their interest towards getting involved in the ongoing work and join the CSISAC delegation at the OECD.

    About the CSISAC

    The CSISAC is the voice of civil society at the OECD Committee on the Digital Economy Policy. We facilitate the exchange of information between the OECD and civil society participants, leading to better-informed and more widely accepted policy frameworks. The formal recognition of this Advisory Committee by the OECD was the result of an effort initiated in the 1990s decade to promote participation parity in the global policy-making. Today, the CSISAC is the main venue to channel the participation of civil society in the OECD work on the digital economy.

    In order to fullfil its mission, CSISAC participates in the regular meetings of the OECD Digital Economy Committee (CDEP) and its working parties: the Working Party on Measurement and Analysis of the Digital Economy (MADE), the Working Party on Communication, Infrastructures and Services Policy (CISP) and the Working Party on Security and Privacy in the Digital Economy (SPDE). In addition, the CSISAC takes part in the OECD Ministerial Meetings organizing a Civil Society Forum, and also in other OECD meetings and projects connected to the Digital Economy Policy.

    The participation of the CSISAC consists in the circulation of the draft reports and working papers of the OECD among civil society experts for analysis and assessment prior to the meeting, attendance by CSISAC representatives at the regular sessions of the OECD committees, and the submission of policy assessments for the ongoing policy guidance. In addition, the CSISAC nominates high level experts to participate in ad-hoc instruments like expert groups or advisory panels linked to specific policy developments.

    The structure of the CSISAC is defined in the CSISAC Charter. To join the CSISAC, individuals or organizations should endorse the Civil Society Seoul Declaration, demonstrate a commitment to the public interest, and do not represent any business, technical organization, government entity, or other institution that sets public policy. To learn more about the CSISAC and how to join, you can visit the CSISAC Website or directly write to the CSISAC Liaison .

    OECD Report: Tax Challenges Arising from Digitalisation

    March 25, 2018

    The OECD has released an interim report on tax challenges arising from digitalisation. This interim report of the OECD/G20 Inclusive Framework on BEPS is a follow-up to the work delivered in 2015 under Action 1 of the BEPS Project on addressing the tax challenges of the digital economy.

    OECD Report: Bridging the Rural Divide

    March 4, 2018

    The OECD has released the report Bridging the Rural Divide, now available for download.

    According to the OECD, this document examines recent policy and technology approaches to bridging the digital divide in rural and remote areas in OECD countries. First, it discusses issues related to assessing broadband gaps, defining speeds and establishing national targets. Second, it describes policies being implemented to improve both access and uptake, such as fostering competition, promoting national, rural and community-led broadband initiatives, supporting open access policies and reducing deployment costs. Finally, it briefly reviews technological developments that are likely to influence the provision of services in underserved areas. Experience in OECD countries with fibre optics, coaxial cable, copper, fixed and mobile wireless, satellites and hybrid approaches, as well as with emerging technologies, are used to illustrate some of the technological trends discussed. This document also includes a summary of common challenges and good practices to bring improved communication services to individuals and communities in rural and remote areas.

    CSISAC Took Part in the OECD Workshop on Digital Security and Resilience in Critical Infrastructure and Essential Services

    February 23, 2018

    The CSISAC has been invited by the OECD CDEP to take part in the OECD Workshop on Digital Security and Resilience in Critical Infrastructure and Essential Services. Lucy Purdon from CSISAC member Privacy International attendeded in the meeting in behalf of the CSISAC.

    The CSISAC notes the unprecedented risks faced by citizens and consumers in developing countries, due to data intensive initiatives lacking adequate security and privacy/ data protection frameworks. Cashless payment systems, biometrics, or credit scoring exemplify some of the ongoing potential risks of exclusion. The OECD privacy, security and cryptography guidelines provide useful directions to follow.

    Fintech, energy and transport infrastructures, together with public services, present the biggest challenges. Market structures should allow governmental management of risk, including consistent reporting on data breaches and vulnerability disclosures. The lack of a common categorisation of critical infrastructures makes it difficult to address the issues of security and resilience. The CSISAC strongly encourages the reinforcement of the ongoing work at the OECD on the measurement and analysis of the digital economy, continuing the previous work on measuring critical infrastructures.

    The CSISAC strongly disagrees with the notion of implementing resilience by enabling backdoors in systems, specially where it regards to breaking cryptography. This counterproductive approach bounces back when systems are compromised. It is not possible to entirely prevent data breaches, security failures or cyber-attacks. Instead of introducing vulnerabilities, resilience can be better built by enacting consistent and timely privacy, data protection and security frameworks; from technologies providing privacy and security by design, and by continuous stakeholder involvement. The CSISAC will continue fostering effective resilience in line with the Civil Society Goals, and the OECD many instruments, notably the Cryptography Guidelines, the Privacy Recommendation, and the Security Guidelines.

    OECD Releases 2017 Edition of the Periodic Global Insurance Market Trends Report

    February 23, 2018

    In the context of the Conference on unleashing the potential of the cyber insurance market, the OECD has released the 2017 edition of the periodic Global Insurance Market Trends report, together with the accompanying statistics. According to the OECD announcement:


    This monitoring report is compiled using data from the OECD Global Insurance Statistics (GIS) database. The geographical reach of the GIS database is constantly expanding and now covers 62 countries. In addition to OECD countries, this includes: a number of non-OECD Latin American countries, achieved through cooperation with the Association of Latin American Insurance Supervisors (ASSAL); several non-OECD countries in Asia; as well as Lithuania, South Africa and, for the first time, Tunisia.

    This monitoring report and the GIS database provide an increasingly valuable cross-country source of data and information on insurance sector developments for use by governmental and supervisory authorities, central banks, the insurance sector and broader financial industry, consumers and the research community.

    Other relevant documents include the the report provided to G7 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors, and the OECD report Enhancing the role of insurance in cyber risk management.

    The CSISAC welcomes the release of these informative reports, and encourages the OECD to continue improving the involvement of Civil Society participants in the analysis and policy-making process on the digital economy.

    UNESCO Internet Universality Indicators: Request for Comments

    February 2, 2018

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has released first draft of the Internet Universality indicators, and opened a request for comments on the report before 15 March 2018. CSISAC member Association for Progressive Communications (APC) has partnered with the UNESCO to provide an online consultation platform. The platform is available in the six UN official languages (Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish).

    From the UNESCO request for comments:

    This report is an interim outcome following the first phase of the consultation, which included 24 face-to-face consultation meetings with 1000 experts from 21 countries and attracted 165 online contributions from 70 countries. UNESCO thus kicks off the second
    phase of the consultation and invites all stakeholders to provide further inputs on these proposed indicators' framework before 15 March 2018. The indicators will be finalized by the end of April2018, following the second phase of the consultation, so your reviews and comments on the draft are crucial!

    We provide all interested stakeholders two ways to contribute to the project and review the first draft indicators document:

    * You are invited to submit your answers to three general
    questions on the online platform or by email to
    internetstudy@unesco.org.

    * If you wish to make more specific comments on the draft
    indicators document, we invite you to connect to the interactive
    platform. This platform has been developed by our partner, the
    Association for Progressive Communications (APC). It allows you
    to comment each proposed indicator as well as interact with the
    other participants of the consultation.

    General enquiries can be issued to UNESCO focal points, Ms Xianhong Hu (x.hu@unesco.org) and Mr. Josselyn Guillarmou (j.guillarmou@unesco.org).